Corona and the Speed of Light

coronavirusHow fast is the speed of light? The scientists will quote numbers but those of us at Ezer Mizion will quote stories instead. Like the family from Italy. They were terrified to remain and fled to Israel. As per government restrictions, they knew they would be going into immediate isolation but where? They had no home. In one day, an apartment was found for them. An apartment to live in but it was empty. Ezer Mizion’s Linked to Life was called into action. Electrical appliances arrived as if by magic. Funds for basics were raised. A grocery shopper materialized. Cooked meals were organized. It touches the heart. If there is something that gives us strength during these difficult days, it’s the spirit of volunteering that we see with Ezer Mizion’s Linked to Life volunteers. Assignments are snatched up at the speed of light.

Ezer Mizion has been around since 1979. Says a staff member: Especially in these challenging days, I feel like I’m giving my debt back to society. I will start from the beginning.  I was eight and a half years old when my mother had breast cancer. Medicine was not developed enough in those days to deal with the disease. My father created a connection with the Ezer Mizion who made sure to schedule an immediate appointment for the doctor in Tel Hashomer. I remember that he told us how he waited there, confused and scared. He said that the volunteers came to him, who brought him food and drink and said that they are now accompanying him and all of us, that we are now family. Really– in these words. And so it was. Since then, Ezer Mizion was always there, in medical counseling that was critical in the great confusion and in sending volunteers who accompanied, supported and helped us throughout the period. After a year of treatments, my mother passed away. 20 years have passed since then. At the age of 10, I started volunteering there. Today, I run the entire north area (from Netanya to the Hermon). I am finally paying back.

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Giving is Healing Translated from Yisrael Hayom, by Dan Lavie

coronavirus

In spite of the serious effects of the Coronavirus in Italy, a cancer patient there received a bone marrow donation from Israel • Director of Ezer Mizion’s Registry: “A tremendous mission”

In the shadow of the spread of the Covid-19 epidemic in the world and its especially harsh effects in Italy, a lifesaving stem cell donation was sent last Wednesday from a donor in Israel to a cancer patient in Italy. For that patient, this delivery of stem cells was a ticket to recovery and life! This feat was accomplished thanks to Ezer Mizion’s International Bone Marrow Donor Registry, which continues functioning despite the unprecedented challenges of this trying period.

At Israel’s Ben Gurion Airport handover hub, an Ezer Mizion Registry representative personally delivered the small package of stem cells to a courier who came especially for this mission from Germany. The courier then transported the stem cells to the hospital in Italy.

More than one million potential stem cell donors who each gave a DNA sample are listed in the Registry. In practice, all the registries in the world are connected via an online network, enabling them to coordinate among themselves when necessary.

In a conversation with Yisrael Hayom, Dr. Bracha Zisser, Director of the Registry, explained the process and discussed the continued activity of the Registry in the shadow of the Coronavirus pandemic. “First a search is done within the family for a matching stem cell donor. Medical teams of patients who do not find a match in the family, search in the international registry network, which pinpoints potential genetically matching donors in registries around the world. In this case, after they saw that we have a matching donor, an official request was submitted to Ezer Mizion’s Registry for workup and stem cell collection.”

Regarding Ezer Mizion’s important work during these complex times, Zisser said: “The situation is especially problematic due to the fact that these patients, who are receiving chemotherapy treatments, cannot wait for six months or until the Coronavirus problem will be resolved. Our primary challenge is how to send the bone marrow unit when so many of the flight routes have been shut down.

“In this area, both the Ministry of Health and the National Security Council cooperated with us successfully, and I am happy to say that the right solutions were found, with the help of airport authorities. In spite of the difficult course in this challenging time, the stem cell unit reached its destination. Here is another tremendous mission of saving a life,” she summed up with satisfaction.

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